Region VII

President Declares Disaster for the State of NebraskaThursday, June 25, 2015 - agrandon

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency announced that federal disaster aid has been made available to the State of Nebraska to supplement state, tribal, and local recovery efforts in the area affected by severe storms, tornadoes, straight-line winds, and flooding during the period of May 6 to June 17, 2015.

The President's action makes federal funding available to state, tribal, and eligible local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by the severe storms, tornadoes, straight-line winds, and flooding in the counties of Cass, Dundy, Gage, Jefferson, Lancaster, Lincoln, Morrill, Nuckolls, Otoe, Saline, Saunders, and Thayer.

Federal funding is available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures for the entire State of Nebraska.

Christian M. Van Alstyne has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area.  Van Alstyne said additional designations may be made at a later date if requested by the state and warranted by the results of further damage assessments.

Following is a summary of key federal disaster aid programs that can be made available as needed and warranted under President Obama's disaster declaration issued for the State of Nebraska.

Assistance for the Territory and Affected Local Governments Can Include as Required:

  • Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for repairing or replacing damaged public facilities, such as roads, bridges, utilities, buildings, schools, recreational areas and similar publicly owned property, as well as certain private non-profit organizations engaged in community service activities. (Source: FEMA funded, territory administered.)
  • Payment of not more than 75 percent of the approved costs for hazard mitigation projects undertaken by state, tribal, and local governments to prevent or reduce long-term risk to life and property from natural or technological disasters.  (Source: FEMA funded, territory administered.)

How to Apply for Assistance:

  • Application procedures for state, tribal, and local governments will be explained at a series of federal/state applicant briefings with locations to be announced in the affected area by recovery officials. Approved public repair projects are paid through the state from funding provided by FEMA and other participating federal agencies.
Hits: 760 

President Declares Disaster for KansasFriday, May 25, 2012 - agrandon

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announced that federal aid has been made available for the state of Kansas and ordered and ordered Federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts in the area affected by severe storms, tornadoes, straight-line winds, and flooding during the period of April 14-15, 2012.

Federal funding is available to state and eligible local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by the severe storms, tornadoes, straight-line winds, and flooding in the counties of Edwards, Ellsworth, Harper, Hodgeman, Jewell, Kiowa, Mitchell, Osborne, Rice, Rush, Russell, Sedgwick, Stafford, and Sumner.

Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures statewide.

Stephen R. Thompson has been named Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area. Thompson said additional designations may be made at a later date if requested by the state and warranted by the results of further damage assessments.

Following is a summary of key federal disaster aid programs that can be made available as needed and warranted under President Obama’s major disaster declaration issued for Kansas.

Assistance for the State and Affected Local, Tribal Governments Can Include as Required:

  • Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for repairing or replacing damaged public facilities, such as roads, bridges, utilities, buildings, schools, recreational areas and similar publicly owned property, as well as certain private non-profit organizations engaged in community service activities. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)
  • Payment of not more than 75 percent of the approved costs for hazard mitigation projects undertaken by state and local governments to prevent or reduce long-term risk to life and property from natural or technological disasters. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)

How to Apply for Assistance:

  • Application procedures for local, tribal and state governments will be explained at a series of federal/state applicant briefings with locations to be announced in the affected area by recovery officials. Approved public repair projects are paid through the state from funding provided by FEMA and other participating federal agencies.

FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

Hits: 1372 

Regional Stakeholders Meet to Discuss Disaster Recovery ...Friday, January 20, 2012 - agrandon

... And Transformation of Emergency Management

KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) Region VII office facilitated a day-long event for stakeholders in emergency management yesterday. Similar events have been and will continue to be hosted by FEMA regional offices throughout the United States in an effort to spread the word about concepts and principles of the National Disaster Recovery Framework (NDRF), which was launched in September 2010.

The National Disaster Recovery Framework recognizes disaster recovery requires a team approach – a team that includes local, state, and tribal governments, the entire federal family of agencies, faith-based and non-profit communities, the private sector and most importantly the public. When all these stakeholders work together as an emergency management team, sustainability is built into communities, making disaster recovery faster and easier.

“This event brought together many people who play a role in disaster recovery throughout our region. They discussed their respective roles, learned from one another and can now go back and begin to integrate National Disaster Recovery Framework principles into the daily operations of their churches, civic and/or volunteer organizations, businesses, government agencies, etc.,” said FEMA Region VII Regional Administrator Beth Freeman. “The main guiding principle of the NDRF asserts recovery takes each and every one of us getting involved in emergency management—from preparing ourselves, families and homes, to reaching out to neighbors and getting involved with organizations to support one another.”

Created in line with the vision set forth in the Presidential Policy Directive on National Preparedness (PPD-8) which directed the agency to work with interagency partners to publish a recovery framework, the NDRF provides guidance that enables effective recovery support to disaster-impacted states, local and tribal governments. The NDRF reflects input gathered from community members and leaders across the country and provides a flexible structure that enables disaster recovery managers to operate in a unified and collaborative manner following a disaster.

The NDRF will help the nation become more resilient because it provides guidance to enable effective federal support to disaster-impacted states, local and tribal governments, by focusing on how best to restore, redevelop and revitalize the health, social, economic, natural and environmental fabric of communities.

“Between them, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri and Nebraska had 11 major disaster declarations in 2011. As a region, we’ve already been using some of the principles found in the NDRF and seeing positive results in, among other places, Joplin and along the shores of the Missouri River,” said Freeman. “Moving forward we will continue the dialog with all our partners and facilitate their engaging one another so the next time a disaster strikes here, and the time after that, we will have more resources and more know-how to support recovery.”

Event attendees included local recovery stakeholders, as well as emergency management partners and stakeholders from neighboring states.

On the federal side, in addition to Regional Administrator Freeman, several other noteworthy recovery leaders were also present, including FEMA’s Deputy Associate Administrator Elizabeth Zimmerman and FEMA Assistant Administrator Deborah Ingram. Likewise, representatives from other federal agencies, such as the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and U.S. Small Business Administration, were also in attendance.

As discussed during the event, the NDRF defines:

  • core recovery principles,
  • roles and responsibilities of recovery coordinators and other stakeholders,
  • a coordinating structure that facilitates communication and collaboration among all stakeholders,
  • guidance for pre- and post-disaster recovery planning, and
  • the overall process by which communities can capitalize on opportunities to rebuild stronger, smarter and safer.

For more information about the NDRF and PPD-8, please visit www.fema.gov/region7.

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

Hits: 1387 

Hazard Mitigation Disaster Advice is Crucial After a Flood Thursday, November 17, 2011 - agrandon

WEST DES MOINES, IOWA -- In the wake of a flood, information becomes as important as food and water to disaster survivors, as well as aid needed to recover.

That’s why the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Hazard Mitigation Advisor is available at the Disaster Recovery Center (DRC) to meet with applicants individually, offering advice on a range of preparedness and hazard mitigation topics, including: how to properly and safely do clean-up after a flood, how to prepare and protect a home from future disasters, and how to apply for insurance through the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

Being prepared is a crucial part of disaster mitigation, whether it’s purchasing flood insurance, house-elevation in a floodplain, or clearing flammable or toxic materials from around the home before a disaster hits.

FEMA’s Hazard Mitigation Advisors, when talking with disaster aid applicants after a flood, will ask two necessary questions: what was the water’s depth and how long did it sit there? Long after flood waters subside, there can still be hidden hazards inside a home, such as mold, and there are safe and unsafe ways to approach clean-up. Hazard Mitigation Advisors are always ready to listen to a disaster survivor’s story, and it helps them evaluate needs when applicants have photographs to show.

FEMA also has a number of publications available, offering important information to applicants on specific steps one should take when cleaning-up a flood-damaged home, or how to safely clean up mold.

“Repairing Your Flooded Home,” “Mold and Mildew,” “Helping Children Cope with Disaster,” and “Answers to Questions about the NFIP” are just a few of FEMA’s publications available at DRCs.

While parents are busy talking with the FEMA Hazard Mitigation Advisor, a child can be learning equally important information about disaster preparedness from FEMA’s educational and fun activity coloring book: “Ready…Set…Prepare! A Disaster Preparedness Activity Book.”

And FEMA includes all household members with its publication for pet owners: “Preparing Your Pets for Emergencies Makes Sense.”

FEMA publications can also be downloaded from FEMA’s disaster-preparedness website www.ready.gov or from www.fema.gov.

FEMA Hazard Mitigation Advisors located at the DRCs will also provide information on flood insurance through the NFIP. This program is open to homeowners, condominium owners, renters, and businesses. FEMA and the Iowa Homeland Security and Emergency Management Division (HSEMD) encourage all citizens living on or near a floodplain to purchase an NFIP policy. For more information, visit www.floodsmart.gov or call 1-800-427-2419.

FEMA and SBA continue to provide face-to-face disaster recovery assistance at the DRC located at:

Pottawattamie County DRC
American Red Cross
Human Services Campus
705 N. 16th Street
Council Bluffs, Ia. 51501
Hours: 9–6 p.m. M-F; Closed Saturday & Sunday

FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

Hits: 1454 

President Declares Disaster For Kansas Saturday, September 24, 2011 - agrandon
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announced that federal aid has been made available to the State of Kansas to supplement state and local recovery efforts in the area affected by flooding during the period of June 1 to August 1, 2011.

Federal funding is available to state and eligible local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by flooding in Atchison, Doniphan, Leavenworth, and Wyandotte counties.

Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures statewide.

Bradley Harris has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area. Harris said that damage surveys are continuing in other areas, and additional counties may be designated for assistance after the assessments are fully completed.

Follow FEMA online at blog.fema.gov, www.twitter.com/fema, www.facebook.com/fema, andwww.youtube.com/fema. Also, follow Administrator Craig Fugate's activities at www.twitter.com/craigatfema.

The social media links provided are for reference only. FEMA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies or applications.

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.
Hits: 1554 

President Declares A Major Disaster For IowaThursday, August 25, 2011 - agrandon

WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announced that federal disaster aid has been made available to Iowa and ordered federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts in the area struck by severe storms, straight-line winds, and flooding during the period of July 9-14, 2011.

Federal funding is available to state  and eligible local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by severe storms, straight-line winds, and flooding in the counties of Benton, Clay, Dickinson, Marshall, Story, and Tama.

Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures statewide.

Michael R. Scott has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area.  Scott said that additional designations may be made at a later date if requested by the state and warranted by the results of further damage assessments.  

Follow FEMA online at blog.fema.govwww.twitter.com/femawww.facebook.com/fema, andwww.youtube.com/fema.  Also, follow Administrator Craig Fugate's activities at www.twitter.com/craigatfema

The social media links provided are for reference only. FEMA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies or applications. 

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

Hits: 1410 

Families With School-Aged Children in Temporary HousingTuesday, August 16, 2011 - agrandon

Release Date: August 15, 2011
Release Number: 1980-147

COLUMBIA, Mo. -- As the opening day of the 2011-2012 school year quickly approaches, families who lost homes to the May tornado look forward to that normal routine as they settle into temporary homes. Through coordination and teamwork since the early days of the tornado, the state-led Disaster Housing Task Force has worked toward the goal of providing housing to all families with school-aged children prior to the opening of school on Aug. 17. More than 200 families with children have received keys to temporary housing units.

"Schools are a rallying point of any community and we recognize the need to see that families with children in school return to a semblance of normal life style as quickly as feasible," said Federal Coordinating Officer Libby Turner. "We worked closely with the state and city to see that this goal was achieved in time for school."

Within days after the tornado, the state-led Disaster Housing Task Force began meeting daily. In coordination with city officials, representatives of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, USDA Rural Development and voluntary agencies assisted the state with establishing housing priorities and ways to maximize housing resources, such as apartments and rental units, and other options if needed.

Immediately after the tornado, FEMA provided financial assistance to families to rent available housing. Less than a month after the tornado, units were installed in commercial parks and families from the priority lists moved in. The first Temporary Housing Unit was installed in a commercial park on June 12. More than 280 families now reside in FEMA-provided mobile homes in the group sites and in commercial parks in the Joplin area.

On July 5, work began on two mobile home communities that would support 346 temporary housing units. The city of Joplin provided the land for the parks at no cost to FEMA in order to speed site selection and construction. Contractors worked 24/7 to install infrastructure. Because the safety of families is of utmost concern to FEMA, tornado safe rooms were installed at the sites before survivors moved in. The first units were placed in Officer Jeff Taylor Memorial Acres on July 23; safe rooms were installed on Aug. 4 and families began moving in on Aug. 5.

Units include both mobile homes and Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards mobile home units, which are built for those individuals who have functional needs.

FEMA's temporary housing assistance and grants for public transportation expenses, medical and dental expenses, and funeral and burial expenses do not require individuals to apply for an SBA loan. However, applicants who receive SBA disaster loan applications must submit them to SBA loan officers to be eligible for assistance that covers personal property, vehicle repair or replacement, and moving and storage expenses.

Disaster recovery assistance is available without regard to race, color, religion, nationality, sex, age, disability, English proficiency or economic status. If you or someone you know has been discriminated against, call FEMA toll-free at 800-621-FEMA (3362). Those with access or functional needs and who use a TTY, call 1-800-462-7585; others may use 711 or Video Relay Service (VRS) to call 1-800-621-3362.

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

 

Hits: 1446