Region IV

Eastern Band of Cherokee Receives More FEMA Funds for Mudslide DamageFriday, May 24, 2013 - agrandon

WASHINGTON – President Barack Obama on Wednesday made additional disaster assistance available to the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians by authorizing an increase in the level of federal funding for Public Assistance projects undertaken by the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians as a result of severe storms, flooding, landslides, and mudslides during the period of January 14-17.

Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians mudslide This road was washed out by the mudslide last January.

Under the President's major disaster declaration issued for the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians on March 1, federal funding was made available for Public Assistance and Hazard Mitigation at 75 percent federal funding of total eligible costs.

Under the President's order today, the federal share for Public Assistance has been increased to 90 percent of the total eligible costs.

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is the first federally recognized Tribe to receive a Presidential Disaster Declaration since the Stafford Act was amended through the Sandy Relief Act in January.

The amendment to the Stafford Act allows American Indian tribes to apply directly to the president through the Federal Emergency Management Agency without application through their respective state.

The Eastern Band of Cherokee worked cooperatively with North Carolina Emergency Management to document damage and to create its request to FEMA for a disaster declaration.

The Tribe experienced approximately $3 million dollars in damage to homes and public infrastructure according to Cherokee Emergency Management Manager Mollie Grant.

In January, Grant indicated FEMA would come back with a final assessment so that the Tribe could apply for mitigation funding.

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President Declares Disaster for FloridaFriday, October 19, 2012 - agrandon

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) today announced that federal disaster assistance has been made available to the State of Florida to supplement state and local recovery efforts in the area affected by Hurricane Isaac during the period of August 27-29, 2012.

Federal funding is available to state and eligible local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by Hurricane Isaac in Bay, Collier, Escambia, Franklin, Gulf, Martin, Monroe, Okaloosa, Palm Beach, St. Lucie, and Santa Rosa counties.

Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures for all counties and tribes within the state.

Gracia B. Szczech has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area. Szczech said additional designations may be made at a later date if requested by the state and warranted by the results of further damage assessments.

Follow FEMA online at http://blog.fema.gov, www.twitter.com/fema, www.facebook.com/fema, and www.youtube.com/fema. Also, follow Administrator Craig Fugate's activities at www.twitter.com/craigatfema. The social media links provided are for reference only.

FEMA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies or applications. FEMA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies or applications.

FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

Last Updated:
October 19, 2012 - 10:44
State or Region:
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President Declares a Major Disaster for AlabamaSunday, September 23, 2012 - agrandon

WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announced that federal aid has been made available for the state of Alabama to supplement state and local recovery efforts in the area affected by Hurricane Isaac during the period of August 26 to September 5, 2012.

Federal funding also is available to state and eligible local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by Hurricane Isaac in the counties of Baldwin, Mobile, and Pickens.

Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures statewide.

Joe M. Girot has been named Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area. Girot said additional designations may be made at a later date if requested by the state and warranted by the results of further damage assessments.

Follow FEMA online at http://blog.fema.gov, www.twitter.com/fema, www.facebook.com/fema, and www.youtube.com/fema. Also, follow Administrator Craig Fugate's activities at www.twitter.com/craigatfema.

The social media links provided are for reference only. FEMA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies or applications.

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

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Florida Community Recognized for Reducing Flood RisksThursday, July 12, 2012 - agrandon

ATLANTA, Ga. -- On July 10, 2012, the town of Miami Lakes, Fla. was recognized at its regular council meeting for its active participation in the National Flood Insurance Program’s (NFIP) Community Rating System (CRS).

The CRS rewards communities that voluntarily take steps to reduce flood risks beyond the minimum requirements of the NFIP. These steps, which include increasing flood protection and implementing preparedness and mitigation activities, lead to safer communities and ultimately help saves lives and property. As a result, property owners and renters in CRS-participating communities enjoy a reduction in flood insurance premiums.

Policyholders in Miami Lakes first began receiving flood insurance discounts under the CRS program in 2006. As a result of additional steps the community has recently taken, the Town of Miami Lakes achieved a CRS Class 5 effective on October 1, 2011.

Policyholders located in the high risk areas of flooding, or Special Flood Hazard Areas, can now receive a 25 percent discount on their policy premium, which is an average savings of $94 per policy. Some policyholders in the lower risk areas are eligible for a ten percent discount.

CRS is a voluntary program for NFIP-participating communities. The intended goals of the program are to reduce flood losses, facilitate accurate insurance ratings and to promote the awareness of flood insurance. For more information on the NFIP’s CRS program visit www.fema.gov/business/nfip/crs.shtm. For more information about the NFIP, a program administered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), visit www.floodsmart.gov.

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

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President Declares Major Disaster for FloridaFriday, July 06, 2012 - agrandon

WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency announced that federal disaster aid has been made available to the State of Florida and ordered federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts in the area affected by Tropical Storm Debby beginning on June 23, 2012, and continuing.

The President's action makes federal funding available to affected individuals in Baker, Bradford, Columbia, Pasco, and Wakulla Counties.
Assistance can include grants for temporary housing and home repairs, low-cost loans to cover uninsured property losses, and other programs to help individuals and business owners recover from the effects of the disaster.

Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures statewide.
Gracia B. Szczech has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area. Szczech said additional designations may be made at a later date if requested by the state and warranted by the results of further damage assessments.

Following is a summary of key federal disaster aid programs that can be made available as needed and warranted under President Obama’s major disaster declaration issued for Florida.

Assistance for Affected Individuals and Families Can Include as Required:

  • Rental payments for temporary housing for those whose homes are unlivable. Initial assistance may be provided for up to three months for homeowners and at least one month for renters. Assistance may be extended if requested after the initial period based on a review of individual applicant requirements. (Source: FEMA funded and administered.)
  • Grants for home repairs and replacement of essential household items not covered by insurance to make damaged dwellings safe, sanitary and functional. (Source: FEMA funded and administered.)
  • Grants to replace personal property and help meet medical, dental, funeral, transportation and other serious disaster-related needs not covered by insurance or other federal, state and charitable aid programs. (Source: FEMA funded at 75 percent of total eligible costs; 25 percent funded by the state.)
  • Unemployment payments up to 26 weeks for workers who temporarily lost jobs because of the disaster and who do not qualify for state benefits, such as self-employed individuals. (Source: FEMA funded; state administered.)
  • Low-interest loans to cover residential losses not fully compensated by insurance. Loans available up to $200,000 for primary residence; $40,000 for personal property, including renter losses. Loans available up to $2 million for business property losses not fully compensated by insurance. (Source: U.S. Small Business Administration.)
  • Loans up to $2 million for small businesses, small agricultural cooperatives and most private, non-profit organizations of all sizes that have suffered disaster-related cash flow problems and need funds for working capital to recover from the disaster's adverse economic impact. This loan in combination with a property loss loan cannot exceed a total of $2 million. (Source: U.S. Small Business Administration.)
  • Loans up to $500,000 for farmers, ranchers and aquaculture operators to cover production and property losses, excluding primary residence. (Source: Farm Service Agency, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.)
  • Other relief programs: Crisis counseling for those traumatized by the disaster; income tax assistance for filing casualty losses; advisory assistance for legal, veterans benefits and social security matters.

Assistance for the State and Affected Local Governments Can Include as Required:

  • Payment of not more than 75 percent of the approved costs for hazard mitigation projects undertaken by state and local governments to prevent or reduce long-term risk to life and property from natural or technological disasters. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)

How to Apply for Assistance:

  • Those in the county designated for assistance to affected residents and business owners can begin the disaster application processby registering online at www.DisasterAssistance.gov, by web enabled mobile device at m.fema.gov or by calling 1-800-621-FEMA (3362). Disaster assistance applicants, who have a speech disability or hearing loss and use TTY, should call 1-800-462-7585 directly; for those who use 711 or Video Relay Service (VRS), call 1-800-621-3362.
  • The toll-free telephone numbers are available from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. (local time) Monday through Sundayuntil further notice. Applicants registering for aid should be prepared to provide basic information about themselves (name, permanent address, phone number), insurance coverage and any other information to help substantiate losses.
  • Application procedures for local and state governments will be explained at a series of federal/state applicant briefings with locations to be announced in the affected area by recovery officials. Approved mitigation projects are paid through the state from funding provided by FEMA and other participating federal agencies.

Follow FEMA online at blog.fema.gov, www.twitter.com/fema, www.facebook.com/fema, and www.youtube.com/fema. Also, follow Administrator Craig Fugate's activities at www.twitter.com/craigatfema.

The social media links provided are for reference only. FEMA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies or applications.

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

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President Declares Disaster For KentuckyWednesday, March 07, 2012 - agrandon

WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency announced that federal disaster aid has been made available to the Commonwealth of Kentucky and ordered federal aid to supplement commonwealth and local recovery efforts in the area affected by severe storms, tornadoes, straight-line winds, and flooding during the period of February 29 to March 3, 2012.

The President's action makes federal funding available to affected individuals in the counties of Johnson, Kenton, Laurel, Lawrence, Menifee, Morgan, and Pendleton.

Assistance can include grants for temporary housing and home repairs, low-cost loans to cover uninsured property losses, and other programs to help individuals and business owners recover from the effects of the disaster.

Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures for all counties and independent cities in the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

Elizabeth Turner has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area. Turner said that damage surveys are continuing in other areas, and more counties and additional forms of assistance may be designated after the assessments are fully completed.

Following is a summary of key federal disaster aid programs that can be made available as needed and warranted under President Obama’s major disaster declaration issued for Kentucky.

Assistance for Affected Individuals and Families Can Include as Required:

  • Rental payments for temporary housing for those whose homes are unlivable. Initial assistance may be provided for up to three months for homeowners and at least one month for renters. Assistance may be extended if requested after the initial period based on a review of individual applicant requirements. (Source: FEMA funded and administered.)
  • Grants for home repairs and replacement of essential household items not covered by insurance to make damaged dwellings safe, sanitary and functional. (Source: FEMA funded and administered.)
  • Grants to replace personal property and help meet medical, dental, funeral, transportation and other serious disaster-related needs not covered by insurance or other federal, state and charitable aid programs. (Source: FEMA funded at 75 percent of total eligible costs; 25 percent funded by the commonwealth.)
  • Unemployment payments up to 26 weeks for workers who temporarily lost jobs because of the disaster and who do not qualify for state benefits, such as self-employed individuals. (Source: FEMA funded; commonwealth administered.)
  • Low-interest loans to cover residential losses not fully compensated by insurance. Loans available up to $200,000 for primary residence; $40,000 for personal property, including renter losses. Loans available up to $2 million for business property losses not fully compensated by insurance. (Source: U.S. Small Business Administration.)
  • Loans up to $2 million for small businesses, small agricultural cooperatives and most private, non-profit organizations of all sizes that have suffered disaster-related cash flow problems and need funds for working capital to recover from the disaster's adverse economic impact. This loan in combination with a property loss loan cannot exceed a total of $2 million. (Source: U.S. Small Business Administration.)
  • Loans up to $500,000 for farmers, ranchers and aquaculture operators to cover production and property losses, excluding primary residence. (Source: Farm Service Agency, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.)
  • Other relief programs: Crisis counseling for those traumatized by the disaster; income tax assistance for filing casualty losses; advisory assistance for legal, veterans benefits and social security matters.

How to Apply for Assistance:

  • Those in the county designated for assistance to affected residents and business owners can begin the disaster application process by registering online at www.DisasterAssistance.gov or by calling 1-800-621-FEMA (3362). Disaster assistance applicants, who have a speech disability or hearing loss and use TTY, should call 1-800-462-7585 directly; for those who use 711 or Video Relay Service (VRS), call 1-800-621-3362.

The toll-free telephone numbers are available from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. (local time) Monday through Sunday until further notice. Applicants registering for aid should be prepared to provide basic information about themselves (name, permanent address, phone number), insurance coverage and any other information to help substantiate losses.

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

Follow FEMA online at blog.fema.gov, www.twitter.com/fema, www.facebook.com/fema, and www.youtube.com/fema. Also, follow Administrator Craig Fugate's activities at www.twitter.com/craigatfema. The social media links provided are for reference only. FEMA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies or applications.

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Federal Disaster Assistance Available to Alabama SurvivorsThursday, February 02, 2012 - agrandon

ATLANTA, Ga. -- Survivors of the severe storms, tornadoes, straight-line winds, and flooding on January 22-23, in Alabama should apply now for federal assistance.

The Feb. 1, Presidential disaster declaration made individual assistance funding available to people affected by the storms in Chilton and Jefferson counties.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency provides assistance in the form of grants for temporary housing, basic home repairs, other serious disaster-related needs, and the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) offers low-interest disaster loans to renters, homeowners and businesses.

However, you must register first. The process only takes 15 to 30 minutes.

You can register online at www.DisasterAssistance.gov or call 800-621-FEMA (3362). Operators speak many languages. Those with hearing or speech impairment can use TTY 800-462-7585.

The toll-free FEMA registration numbers are available seven days a week from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. local time.

You can also apply for federal assistance directly through Web-enabled devices or smartphones. Registration through the mobile site takes three steps:

  1. Go to m.fema.gov and click “Apply Online for FEMA Assistance.” You will be directed to www.DisasterAssistance.gov;
  2. Click on Start Registration; and
  3. Fill out the registration form.

FEMA will ask you for the following information:

  • The telephone number where you can be reached;
  • The address where you lived at the time of the disaster and the address where you are currently staying;
  • Your Social Security Number;
  • A general description of damage to your property and other losses;
  • The name of your insurance company and your policy number or agent if you have property insurance for the January 22-23 storms; and
  • Your bank account routing information if you want FEMA to use direct deposit.

Individual assistance helps eligible applicants with temporary housing assistance, uninsured personal property losses and medical, dental and funeral expenses caused by the disaster, along with other disaster-related expenses and serious needs. Low-interest disaster loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration also will be available to cover residential and business losses not covered by insurance.

Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures statewide.

Disaster recovery assistance is available without regard to race, color, religion, nationality, sex, age, disability, English proficiency or economic status. If you or someone you know has been discriminated against, call FEMA toll-free at 800-621-FEMA (3362). For TTY call 800-462-7585.

FEMA’s temporary housing assistance and grants for public transportation expenses, medical and dental expenses, and funeral and burial expenses do not require individuals to apply for an SBA loan. However, applicants who receive SBA loan applications must submit them to SBA loan officers to be eligible for assistance that covers personal property, vehicle repair or replacement, and moving and storage expenses.

FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

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What to Expect After Registering With FEMA Tuesday, September 06, 2011 - agrandon

RALEIGH, N.C. -- After registering with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, every applicant will receive a packet of information regarding their request for help.

Based on information supplied during registration, applicants may be referred by FEMA to another agency or voluntary organization that may help with emergency food, shelter, clothing or medical needs.

If a homeowner reports damage when registering, a FEMA-contracted inspector will call to make an appointment to meet at the damaged residence. The inspector is there to verify damage to the home and contents. All inspectors have FEMA-issued photo identification and do not ask for personal information or money.

Renters should also expect a call and visit from an inspector who will verify damage to personal property.

If an inspector does not call within 10 days to make an appointment, applicants should call the FEMA helpline at 800-621-3362. The helpline is also available for any questions regarding the forms in the packet.

It is important that applicants keep the appointment with the inspector.

Some survivors will be sent a Small Business Administration low-interest disaster loan application. Applicants will not be required to borrow money, but some types of FEMA assistance can only be provided after the loan package has been completed and returned.

After the inspection of damage to home or personal property, FEMA will notify the applicant by mail regarding what assistance is available or what additional information is needed.

Anyone with questions should not hesitate to go to the nearest disaster recovery center or call the FEMA helpline.

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

 

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President Declares Emergency For North CarolinaFriday, August 26, 2011 - agrandon

WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announced that federal aid has been made available to North Carolina to supplement the state and local response efforts in the area due to the emergency conditions resulting from Hurricane Irene beginning on August 25, 2011, and continuing.

The President's action authorizes the Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), to coordinate all disaster relief efforts which have the purpose of alleviating the hardship and suffering caused by the emergency on the local population, and to provide appropriate assistance for required emergency measures, authorized under Title V of the Stafford Act, to save lives and to protect property and public health and safety, and to lessen or avert the threat of a catastrophe in the counties of counties of Carteret, Craven, Currituck, Dare, Halifax, Hyde, Johnston, Jones, Nash, Northampton, Onslow, Pamlico, Perquimans, Pitt, Tyrrell, and Wilson.

Specifically, FEMA is authorized to identify, mobilize, and provide at its discretion, equipment and resources necessary to alleviate the impacts of the emergency.  Emergency protective measures, limited to direct federal assistance, will be provided at 75 percent federal funding. 

Michael F. Byrne has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area.  

Follow FEMA online at blog.fema.govwww.twitter.com/femawww.facebook.com/fema, andwww.youtube.com/fema.  Also, follow Administrator Craig Fugate's activities at www.twitter.com/craigatfema

The social media links provided are for reference only. FEMA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies or applications. 

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

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Private Sector Helps Alabama RecoverThursday, August 18, 2011 - agrandon

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. – After the April storms and tornadoes destroyed thousands of homes and businesses across two-thirds of Alabama, a large-scale response and recovery effort was needed. A significant part of that effort was Alabama’s private sector, which continues to play a key role in the state’s recovery.

Recovery from such devastation involves local, state and federal agencies, voluntary agencies, faith-based organizations and the state’s private sector, including the business community, utilities, banking industry, insurance industry and other organizations.

In Alabama, the private sector assisted in getting survivors to register with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, provided advertising about disaster assistance, worked with the state and FEMA to help survivors with banking and insurance issues and generally supported the effort to help communities and survivors.

“The private sector is essential to a strong recovery effort,” said Jeff Byard, state coordinating officer for the Alabama Emergency Management Agency. “These organizations have done a wonderful job helping people get back on their feet.”

At the outset of the disaster response, specialists with the private sector component of FEMA’s external affairs operation deployed to Alabama and began working with 65 chambers of commerce in 43 counties, industry groups, colleges and other organizations.

They met with employers to spread the word about how survivors could apply for disaster assistance. They produced an electronic newsletter that provided outreach to more than 400,000 people. They worked with utility companies to include FEMA registration information on billing statements, reaching nearly 2 million customers. They supplied information to banks to assist in the cashing of FEMA assistance checks.

Outdoor advertising was donated on billboards that reached over 1 million people every day. The University of Alabama Athletic Department and the NFL Players Association helped arrange public service appearances and announcements by athletes.

The private sector played a key role in assisting the state with other big initiatives, including the Safer Alabama Summit, a series of Housing and Recovery Expos and the Alabama Municipal League Expo.

Large retailers such as Wal-Mart, Marvin’s Home Improvement Stores, Lowe’s, Ace Hardware and Home Depot made stores available for FEMA staff to provide information about building safer homes.

“The whole community is engaged in the recovery,” said Michael F. Byrne, federal coordinating officer for FEMA. “The private sector has helped us get the word out about registration, assistance and building a stronger, safer, more resilient Alabama.”

FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

Disaster recovery assistance is available without regard to race, color, religion, nationality, sex, age, disability, English proficiency or economic status. If you or someone you know has been discriminated against, call FEMA toll-free at 800-621-FEMA (3362). If you have a speech disability or hearing loss and use a TTY, call 800-462-7585 directly; if you use 711 or Video Relay Service (VRS), call 800-621-3362.

The social media links provided are for reference only. FEMA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies or applications.

 

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For Storm Survivors, Permanent Housing is the GoalTuesday, August 16, 2011 - agrandon

Release Date: August 16, 2011
Release Number: 1971-153


BIRMINGHAM, Ala. – For Alabamians affected by the April storms and tornadoes, now is the time to work toward a permanent housing plan. The Alabama Emergency Management Agency and the Federal Emergency Management Agency encourage you to consider all options available, including local resources, in making a long-term plan.

Save money. Save receipts. Stay in touch.

“Finding and securing permanent housing can be a daunting task, especially for disaster survivors,” said Jeff Byard, state coordinating officer for AEMA. “It can be tough to know where to begin. Three things survivors can do now to begin the process is to save money, save receipts and stay in touch.”

Whether you’re looking for long-term rental housing, rebuilding your home or looking to buy a home, the first thing you should do is begin setting aside as much money as you can. By saving up, you’ll be better prepared to act when you find a housing solution that fits your needs.

It’s very important to document your recovery costs, especially if you’ve received grant money from FEMA. Make sure to save receipts from supplies, contractor work and any other disaster-related expenses. This will help state, federal and voluntary agencies provide further assistance.

Some survivors may not know where to go for help. You can stay in touch with FEMA by contacting your caseworker or by calling the FEMA helpline at 800-621-FEMA (3362) or TTY 800-462-7585. Phone lines are available every day from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. local time.

Different situations call for different plans of action. If you have received rental assistance through FEMA, the following steps will assist you in securing a permanent housing plan.

If you are looking for rental housing:

•Document all attempts to find permanent housing. Every time you call a landlord, write it down. Not every home will fit your needs, but you must make the attempt.
If you have found rental housing:

•Update your status with FEMA by contacting your caseworker or calling the helpline. FEMA needs to know of any changes.
If you are a homeowner rebuilding your home:

•Ensure that you have all required permits and find a reliable and reputable contractor. FEMA does not certify contractors.
•If you are living in your home, you may use your rental assistance grant to assist in the rebuilding of your home.
•If you applied for a Small Business Administration loan, check the status of your application. Call the SBA toll free at 800-659-2955 or (800-877-8339 TTY).
•If you were denied an SBA loan, you may be eligible for more federal assistance. Call the FEMA helpline for more information.
Resources to help find permanent housing

“There are a variety of resources for survivors who need assistance,” said Michael Byrne, federal coordinating officer for FEMA. “Doing your research and finding the best fit for you and your family will make a big difference in your recovery.”

Housing resources can be found online at the FEMA housing portal at http://go.usa.gov/Khe. The housing portal is an online tool that allows you to search rental housing in your area. You can search for properties by bedroom, price, and location. The portal combines rental resources identified and provided by federal agencies, private organizations and the public.

To provide practical housing solutions, the State of Alabama has created an initiative using the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development online database at http://www.HudHomeStore.com/HudHome/Index.aspx. Here you can locate foreclosed homes and get information on how to use federal disaster grant money to purchase a home. Homes that need repair will then be referred to volunteers in the state to perform those repairs. For more information, visit the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs website, http://ADECA.alabama.gov.

Survivors with functional needs who require assistance finding and moving into permanent housing or help with rebuilding are asked to call Alabama Connects 2-1-1 for help from voluntary agencies.

Disaster recovery assistance is available without regard to race, color, religion, nationality, sex, age, disability, English proficiency or economic status. If you or someone you know has been discriminated against, call FEMA toll-free at 800-621-FEMA (3362). If you have a speech disability or hearing loss and use a TTY, call 800-462-7585 directly; if you use 711 or Video Relay Service (VRS), call 800-621-3362.

The social media links provided are for reference only. FEMA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies or applications.

ADECA administers numerous programs to strengthen Alabama communities and has been named the state coordinator for long-term community recovery.

FEMA’s temporary housing assistance and grants for public transportation expenses, medical and dental expenses, and funeral and burial expenses do not require individuals to apply for an SBA loan. However, applicants who receive SBA loan applications must submit them to SBA loan officers to be eligible for assistance that covers personal property, vehicle repair or replacement, and moving and storage expenses.

 

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